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  2. It is your choice whether you get the vaccine. The vaccine produces an immune response. Some people refer to the headaches, arm ache, temperature, tiredness, etc, that some people experience as side effects but in reality this is what you want... it means your body has noticed the (inactive) virus and is responding to it. If you look at the statistics for the number of positive cases detected through testing (see Worldometer) the US has confirmed 34 million cases in a population of 332 million. So roughly 1 in 10 people have been infected. Of these 614,000 did not survive. That works out
  3. To get the vaccine or not? I'm afraid getting COVID with PSD would be worse than the average person would experience, but I also am terrified of an injection that sends messages to my already confused blood messaging system. Please share your experience or knowledge on how those of us with PSD should move forward. I understand it is dangerous to hand out medical advice, but all of us with PSD know how hard it is to find anyone who has studied PSD and we lean on fellow sufferers for their experience.
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  5. I have Protein S Deficiency with a history of DVT and PE, and have been taking warfarin for around 30 years. My first wisdom tooth was removed in 2006, another in 2010, my third in 2016, and my last yesterday. I previously reported about my first extraction here and thought it might be worth an update to share some new details. This dentist required an INR of between 2.0 and 4.0 with a test taken in the previous 2 days. The advice appears to have changed over the years because it should be within this range under normal circumstances, and previously I was asked to reduce my INR to a
  6. Thrombosis can cause depletion of Protein S. In the case of Covid-19 the virus causes inflammation of the lungs, and subsequent damage causes clotting. The virus itself doesn’t cause the clots directly. To be reliable the screening for your diagnosis should have been based on blood samples taken a couple of months after your thrombosis, when your natural levels would have recovered.
  7. I was originally diagnosed with a portal vein thrombosis around the same time I lost my sense of smell for over a year. (This was about 6 years ago at age 49.) The olfactory loss was brought on by a viral infection (viral anosmia). I now wonder whether I had a type of coronavirus that affected my protein-s levels. I was diagnosed with borderline protein-s deficiency after the clot in my portal vein showed up. After I came off the warfarin for it, I had a subsequent DVT and am now on thinners for life. None of this kind of thing ever ran in my family and I've always been in good health generall
  8. The eligibility criteria for joining the UK Royal Navy and Royal Marines includes age, height, weight, tattoos and piercings, eye sight, pregnancy and minimum fitness targets. The current medical restrictions include ‘any bleeding disorder or abnormality of blood clotting’ as set out in the following PDF document. https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/-/media/files/cnr-pdfs/20201127eligibility-formworduc15122020update.pdf
  9. Synchronous presentation of COVID‐19 pneumonia and pulmonary embolism Farid Poursadegh, Najmeh Davoudian, Mahnaz Mozdourian, Fahimeh Abdollahi First published: 27 January 2021, https://doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.3870 *** Simultaneous diagnosis of COVID‐19 pneumonia and pulmonary embolism without any deep vein thrombosis nor predisposing hypercoagulable states was observed. Therefore, patients with COVID‐19 pneumonia who suffer from worsening of the clinical respiratory symptoms, after the beginning of the treatment, should be evaluated for pulmonary embolism using CT angiography, if
  10. Instagram celebrity Mrs Hinch has Protein S deficiency and Factor V Leiden, in the The Sun news. Mrs Hinch previously opened up about her health problems in her book, Hinch Yourself Happy. She was forced to miss her honeymoon a few years ago after falling ill with a blood clot, suffering back pain and a swollen leg, which left her unable to stand. https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/12611235/mrs-hinch-blood-condition-bruises/
  11. Rory Bremner has revealed in a Daily Mail interview that he and his brother have Protein S Deficiency... ‘My Dad died of cancer in 1979 when he was 72 and I was 18. My older brother Nigel has protein S deficiency, a blood clotting disorder. A year ago, I had a curious itchy rash on my shin and my wife thought a clot was developing. Sure enough, I also have protein S deficiency. It can only be treated with anticoagulant medication.’ Interview appears below this article... https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-9185645/Why-taking-afternoon-nap-not-dozy-idea.html
  12. It would be best for you to speak to your doctor and ask for a referral to a haematologist for your longer term healthcare options. They will understand how to obtain a test result that gives an accurate understanding of whether you have a natural deficiency in your Protein C or Protein S levels. Unfortunately test results can be unreliable if they are taken at the same time as the thrombosis or soon after, so you need to have a recovery period and let things settle down before testing takes place. A haematologist will usually look into family history and screening of your relatives too... for
  13. Hello, My name is Yogesh and I am 27 years old recently I was having symptoms like abdomen pain and back pain so I had done CT scans and I was diagnosed with with superior mesenteric vein thrombosis also there is jejunal thinking but after treatment of heparin and other medications there was no need of surgery thank God. In recent CT scan the jejunal thickening has been resolved also thrombosis is reduced in size and extent. In the mena time doctor tested my blood for protein S deficiency and c deficiency the level of protein s is 37 and protein C is 73 doctor asked me to take anticoagulant fo
  14. Dr Shelley Hayles is a GP based in Oxford involved in helping set up the trial. She believes that up to 10% of those who have had Covid-19 might have some form of lung damage which is leading to prolonged symptoms. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55017301
  15. Just my personal opinion, I don't have any science papers to support my comments, and you could probably argue either way depending on your outlook.
  16. You are right, news reports about the Coronavirus often refer to Protein S but they are talking about a Protein Spike, when describing the virus itself. This has nothing to do with the Protein S that circulates in our blood. Anticoagulants are sometimes used in the treatment of Covid. The research shown above suggests that Protein S levels may be reduced by Covid, perhaps contributing to the possibility of clot formation. However that research was not conducted with a Protein S Deficiency in mind, and just as you could argue it might make the deficiency worse, it could also mean that we a
  17. On the same topic: As vaccines are coming on stream it is said most work by modifying or connecting to an S protein on the virus also, I think called the Spike protein. What are the implications for those of us with a Protein S deficiency? Are we protected, or more likely to develop problems if infected with Covid 19? Would we be able to have a vaccine or not? Would our medication, Rivaroxaban in my case, conflict with the Vaccine? Or is the whole thing unrelated and of no concern? These are things our local GP will almost certainly no know.
  18. Related topic on MERTK... https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0225051 The role of endothelial MERTK during the inflammatory response in lungs
  19. Role of Vitamin K-Dependent Factors Protein S and GAS6 and TAM Receptors in SARS-CoV-2 Infection and COVID-19-Associated Immunothrombosis by Anna Tutusaus 1, Montserrat Marí 1, José T. Ortiz-Pérez 2,3, Gerry A. F. Nicolaes 4, Albert Morales 1,5,* and Pablo García de Frutos 1,3,* Cells 2020, 9(10), 2186; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9102186 (registering DOI) https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4409/9/10/2186 The vitamin K-dependent factors protein S (PROS1) and growth-arrest-specific gene 6 (GAS6) and their tyrosine kinase receptors TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK, the TAM subfamily of receptor
  20. I have Protein S deficiency. I have been on warfarin since I was diagnosed. I'm glad more work is being done on this.
  21. UK Researchers Identify COVID-19 Blood Clotting Cause By Elizabeth Chapin https://uknow.uky.edu/research/uk-researchers-identify-covid-19-blood-clotting-cause LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 17, 2020) — A new University of Kentucky College of Medicine study may provide answers for why so many COVID-19 patients experience thrombosis, or the formation of blood clots that obstruct blood flow through the circulatory system. The research led by Jeremy Wood, Zach Porterfield and Jamie Sturgill in the Department of Internal Medicine; Beth Garvy in Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Ge
  22. I’ve heard that Eliquis and Pradaxa are not really suitable for treating Protein S or C deficiency. Is this true? I’m on Warfarin and want to avoid the regular INR CHECKING AND FLUCTUATION ISSUES.
  23. Anticoagulant protein S – new insights on interactions and functions Magdalena Gierula, Josefin Ahnström First published: 23 July 2020 https://doi.org/10.1111/jth.15025 Protein S is a critical regulator of coagulation that functions as a cofactor for the activated protein C (APC) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) pathways. It also has direct anticoagulant functions, inhibiting the intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase complexes. Through these functions, protein S regulates coagulation during both its initiation and its propagation phases. The importance of protein S in haemo
  24. A medical research paper (by Rezende, Simmonds, Lane) suggested Protein S Deficiency may be related to other health conditions besides thrombosis. This is because Protein S interacts with the C4b-binding protein (C4BP). In their conclusion they asked the question: what are the consequences of reduced levels of Protein S on C4BP, and could it be linked to inflammation and autoimmune diseases? Together, we may be able to help answer that question. David Hansson is currently researching this issue and has created an online survey asking about any additional diseases and symptoms affe
  25. Coagulation, inflammation, and apoptosis: different roles for protein S and the protein S–C4b binding protein complex Suely Meireles Rezende, Rachel Elizabeth Simmonds, David Anthony Lane Blood (2004) 103 (4): 1192–1201. Abstract Protein S (PS) has an established role as an important cofactor to activated protein C (APC) in the degradation of coagulation cofactors Va and VIIIa. This anticoagulant role is evident from the consequences of its deficiency, when there is an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. In human plasma, PS circulates approximately 40% as free PS (FPS)
  26. Last year I started to get problems with loss of sensation in my feet. I thought it was best to get it checked out because of concerns about reduced circulation with my DVT history and post thrombotic syndrome. I had a CT scan and saw an MSK consultant (musculoskeletal), a physio, and then a neurologist. I was subsequently diagnosed with mild peripheral neuropathy. It isn't related to Protein S Deficiency. And there isn't much they can do about it. Just to be sure, the neurologist then requested a wide range of blood tests, and one of the results came back with an odd result. There a
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