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James

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  • Birthday 09/10/1969

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  1. The eligibility criteria for joining the UK Royal Navy and Royal Marines includes age, height, weight, tattoos and piercings, eye sight, pregnancy and minimum fitness targets. The current medical restrictions include ‘any bleeding disorder or abnormality of blood clotting’ as set out in the following PDF document. https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/-/media/files/cnr-pdfs/20201127eligibility-formworduc15122020update.pdf
  2. Synchronous presentation of COVID‐19 pneumonia and pulmonary embolism Farid Poursadegh, Najmeh Davoudian, Mahnaz Mozdourian, Fahimeh Abdollahi First published: 27 January 2021, https://doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.3870 *** Simultaneous diagnosis of COVID‐19 pneumonia and pulmonary embolism without any deep vein thrombosis nor predisposing hypercoagulable states was observed. Therefore, patients with COVID‐19 pneumonia who suffer from worsening of the clinical respiratory symptoms, after the beginning of the treatment, should be evaluated for pulmonary embolism using CT angiography, if
  3. Instagram celebrity Mrs Hinch has Protein S deficiency and Factor V Leiden, in the The Sun news. Mrs Hinch previously opened up about her health problems in her book, Hinch Yourself Happy. She was forced to miss her honeymoon a few years ago after falling ill with a blood clot, suffering back pain and a swollen leg, which left her unable to stand. https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/12611235/mrs-hinch-blood-condition-bruises/
  4. Rory Bremner has revealed in a Daily Mail interview that he and his brother have Protein S Deficiency... ‘My Dad died of cancer in 1979 when he was 72 and I was 18. My older brother Nigel has protein S deficiency, a blood clotting disorder. A year ago, I had a curious itchy rash on my shin and my wife thought a clot was developing. Sure enough, I also have protein S deficiency. It can only be treated with anticoagulant medication.’ Interview appears below this article... https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-9185645/Why-taking-afternoon-nap-not-dozy-idea.html
  5. It would be best for you to speak to your doctor and ask for a referral to a haematologist for your longer term healthcare options. They will understand how to obtain a test result that gives an accurate understanding of whether you have a natural deficiency in your Protein C or Protein S levels. Unfortunately test results can be unreliable if they are taken at the same time as the thrombosis or soon after, so you need to have a recovery period and let things settle down before testing takes place. A haematologist will usually look into family history and screening of your relatives too... for
  6. Dr Shelley Hayles is a GP based in Oxford involved in helping set up the trial. She believes that up to 10% of those who have had Covid-19 might have some form of lung damage which is leading to prolonged symptoms. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55017301
  7. Just my personal opinion, I don't have any science papers to support my comments, and you could probably argue either way depending on your outlook.
  8. You are right, news reports about the Coronavirus often refer to Protein S but they are talking about a Protein Spike, when describing the virus itself. This has nothing to do with the Protein S that circulates in our blood. Anticoagulants are sometimes used in the treatment of Covid. The research shown above suggests that Protein S levels may be reduced by Covid, perhaps contributing to the possibility of clot formation. However that research was not conducted with a Protein S Deficiency in mind, and just as you could argue it might make the deficiency worse, it could also mean that we a
  9. Related topic on MERTK... https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0225051 The role of endothelial MERTK during the inflammatory response in lungs
  10. Role of Vitamin K-Dependent Factors Protein S and GAS6 and TAM Receptors in SARS-CoV-2 Infection and COVID-19-Associated Immunothrombosis by Anna Tutusaus 1, Montserrat Marí 1, José T. Ortiz-Pérez 2,3, Gerry A. F. Nicolaes 4, Albert Morales 1,5,* and Pablo García de Frutos 1,3,* Cells 2020, 9(10), 2186; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9102186 (registering DOI) https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4409/9/10/2186 The vitamin K-dependent factors protein S (PROS1) and growth-arrest-specific gene 6 (GAS6) and their tyrosine kinase receptors TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK, the TAM subfamily of receptor
  11. UK Researchers Identify COVID-19 Blood Clotting Cause By Elizabeth Chapin https://uknow.uky.edu/research/uk-researchers-identify-covid-19-blood-clotting-cause LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 17, 2020) — A new University of Kentucky College of Medicine study may provide answers for why so many COVID-19 patients experience thrombosis, or the formation of blood clots that obstruct blood flow through the circulatory system. The research led by Jeremy Wood, Zach Porterfield and Jamie Sturgill in the Department of Internal Medicine; Beth Garvy in Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Ge
  12. Anticoagulant protein S – new insights on interactions and functions Magdalena Gierula, Josefin Ahnström First published: 23 July 2020 https://doi.org/10.1111/jth.15025 Protein S is a critical regulator of coagulation that functions as a cofactor for the activated protein C (APC) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) pathways. It also has direct anticoagulant functions, inhibiting the intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase complexes. Through these functions, protein S regulates coagulation during both its initiation and its propagation phases. The importance of protein S in haemo
  13. A medical research paper (by Rezende, Simmonds, Lane) suggested Protein S Deficiency may be related to other health conditions besides thrombosis. This is because Protein S interacts with the C4b-binding protein (C4BP). In their conclusion they asked the question: what are the consequences of reduced levels of Protein S on C4BP, and could it be linked to inflammation and autoimmune diseases? Together, we may be able to help answer that question. David Hansson is currently researching this issue and has created an online survey asking about any additional diseases and symptoms affe
  14. Coagulation, inflammation, and apoptosis: different roles for protein S and the protein S–C4b binding protein complex Suely Meireles Rezende, Rachel Elizabeth Simmonds, David Anthony Lane Blood (2004) 103 (4): 1192–1201. Abstract Protein S (PS) has an established role as an important cofactor to activated protein C (APC) in the degradation of coagulation cofactors Va and VIIIa. This anticoagulant role is evident from the consequences of its deficiency, when there is an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. In human plasma, PS circulates approximately 40% as free PS (FPS)
  15. Last year I started to get problems with loss of sensation in my feet. I thought it was best to get it checked out because of concerns about reduced circulation with my DVT history and post thrombotic syndrome. I had a CT scan and saw an MSK consultant (musculoskeletal), a physio, and then a neurologist. I was subsequently diagnosed with mild peripheral neuropathy. It isn't related to Protein S Deficiency. And there isn't much they can do about it. Just to be sure, the neurologist then requested a wide range of blood tests, and one of the results came back with an odd result. There a
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