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Research into the use of Statins and PSD


Guest JJones

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Guest JJones

I was diagnosed with PSD about 18 years ago after it was discovered my brother had the same problem. He unfortunately died when he was 36 some 15 years ago. We were both diagnosed at Queens Medical in Nottingham. My doctor has just informed me that my colestral is a little high and wants to place me on Statins. I would like to know if there has been any reseach into the use and effects of Statins and PSD. I have read an awful lot about the negative side effects of statins therefore I am a little worried. I was very active owning my own horse and riding every day. Swimming etc. but Arthritis in my neck and bad wear and tear in a couple of facet joints in my back have stopped me from doing either. I would be grateful if anyone could shed any light on this subject.

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  • 3 weeks later...

http://cks.library.nhs.uk/lipids_managemen...ions_of_statins

Table 1. Managing key drug interactions of statins.

Simvastatin and atorvastatin are both metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP3A4. Pravastatin and rosuvastatin are not substantially metabolized by cytochrome P450. Fluvastatin is metabolized by a different cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP 2C9)

Outcome Effect - Possible increased plasma warfarin concentration.

Action to Take - Check INR levels in the early stages of concurrent use of any statin with warfarin (or after statin dose increases), particularly for those with a higher baseline INR. Caution is particularly necessary with fluvastatin (competes with warfarin for metabolism by CYP 2C9). The interaction is less of a concern with pravastatin (not metabolised by cytochrome P450).

http://www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/bandolier/band113/b113-2.html

Statins and the law of unintended consequences

Summary - A reader asked Bandolier whether it was true that it was dangerous to stop taking statins. Given that statins are among the safest of drugs, this seemed a rather curious question to which the answer was blisteringly obvious. If statins were given to prevent something bad happening, then stopping them might make the bad thing more likely to happen. A quick search turned up two pieces of evidence which imply that stopping or changing statins could increase vascular risk by about three times. There are some complexities in the biology that might make this an interesting area to keep an eye on.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Many thanks for the information you supplied, however, I am not, and have never been on Warfarin. At the time of my diagnosis PSD was a relatively new find! I was sent to a hematologist at St. Peters, Chertsey, near to where I live. Her advice to me was that I would not be able to take the pill due to the estrogen causing blood clots, and that no counter measures were to be taken as far as the PSD was concerned unless I had a blood clot (by which time it could be too late anyway!!). I am not on aspirin or anything.

I am not sure if I am supposed to take warfarin or aspirin because my doctors are still a bit wobbly on the PSD area. He seems to think that it is important for me to take statins if my colestoral rises any further.

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Guest Mark Ranger

This is interesting, having recently started on Statins for high cholesterol, but not being on Warfarin, until of course such time as I get another DVT...

Not being medically minded, am I right in interpreting your reply James that Statins have a blood thinning effect in the same way that Warfarin does?

In which case, it seems good news - on the face of it

Mark

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Guest Mark Ranger

To answer my own post (sad life isn't it?!)

I spoke to a consultant who I had seen a couple of years ago and he says that the issue is when you are taking Statins AND Warfarin.

Statins on their own do not act as an anti-coagulant.

I hope that's of help to anyone

Mark

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  • 3 months later...

Hi Everyone,

Sorry I have been out of touch recently, however I am back and keen to be an active member. I have just come back from the Doctors, and have been told (not for the first time over the last 10 years) that my Cholesterol results are high. I have a figure for total chol of 9, Ratio of 7 and triglycerides are at 6. this is high in the normal run of things, however I have had figures as high as 12.9 for total ch levels. The thing is that I run regularly, and do not have an excessive diet of fat etc... nor do I have a weight problem. The doctors want me on avotostatin to reduce the Cholesterol figures but I am not keen because of the (still) unkonwn effects long term. I can reduce to about 5.5 on a VERY strict almost zero fat diet but that is difficult with a family. So, I guess the questions I would like to ask are

1. Is there a link between being a PSD individual and the occurance of high Cholesterol?"

2. If you have PSD (my count is 22) is the lower the count bringing more risk of higher cholesterol?"

3. Are the two linked or not and if they are do they work in opposition to each other?

4. Are the two in anyway linked to the functioning of an individuals liver??

Edited by Waikanae Al
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Thanks for that James. I have read as much as I can about the PSD and Cholesterol, and I am aware that the liver performs a function in both areas. Cholesterol is part diet (obviously) and part liver production. As the protein is manufactured inthe liver, I was pondering if there was any connection. There seems to be some medical articles warning of some interaction and the possibility of false reults on tests if the patient has both conditions, and there looks like a nod towards the effects of a higher cholesterol rating affecting the PSD condition. Perhapse there are more people out there with PSD that have high lipid blood counts than know about it... it could be an interesting area to ask a general question on...maybe? I dont want to start taking statins as I dont feel comfrotable with the lack of long term medical findings (if they potentially affect the liver it may not be a good choice :D ) However if they do a "good job" and reduce risk it is good, but what if the PSD is skewing results???

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