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Todd

Natural Treatment for protein s deficiency

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Hello everybody. I am new to this forum. I'm a 60-year-old guy in pretty good shape. Here's my question (which I'm afraid I already know the answer to): Can you "naturally" treat Protein S deficiency? Blood tests a couple of years ago suggested that my protein s was on the low side and then showed it bounced back into the low-normal range. Unfortunately, I've had a portal vein thrombosis (about 2 years ago) and just this month, after a long 2-day car trip, driving 9 hours a day) a DVT (but which I think probably isn't my first since I've been suffering from all the usual symptoms of PTS ever since taking a couple of very long airline flights about 7 years ago). I read that protein S deficiency could be a result of Vit K deficiency... so if I were to up my vit K intake, stay hydrated, consume more fish oil and other appropriate dietary/nutritional measures, run regularly, etc. would i be able to keep my blood from clotting without warfarin?

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Blood clotting is a process with many stages and interactions. If you make a comparison to baking a cake you probably know that leaving out a key ingredient, such as the flour, will affect the end result. Similarly adding more of other ingredients, such as the sugar, may tweak the results slightly. Changing other ingredients, such as the raising agent, could give wild and unpredictable results.

When it comes to Protein S Deficiency, making changes to your diet may be helpful but it isn’t going to fix the underlying issue. You will still have that risk factor to take into account. However don’t let that stop you from aiming for a healthier lifestyle.

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Just to update with couple of comments, even though this topic is from a year or two ago:

1/ If you have hereditary Protein S Deficiency you do not need to be concerned about Vitamin K unless you are taking anticoagulants such as warfarin (brand name, Coumadin). If you are taking warfarin you will be encouraged to manage your natural Vitamin K dietary intake because it interacts with the drug and affects dosage requirements. In some cases, to help smooth out dosage requirements you may be asked to take a Vitamin K supplement but you should only do this if directed.

2/ If you have acquired Protein S Deficiency this may be caused by pregnancy and other health conditions. For example celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, and digestive issues can lead to a deficiency of Vitamin K, which in turn can reduce production of Protein S. Most of our Vitamin K comes from our diet and digestion so it is unusual for the average adult to have a Vitamin K deficiency. A new born baby is given a booster shortly after delivery to make up for the lower level they start out with, bearing in mind their dietary intake will come later when they start feeding. However having too much Vitamin K can be harmful (especially for kidney disorders), so you should avoid taking supplements unless directed. And you don’t need Vitamin K in your diet every day because any that is surplus to your body’s immediate requirements is stored in the liver for future use.

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Thanks James; I appreciate the response! I'm now on Warfarin for life (per doctor's request), so I'm living with the realization that my blood issue isn't something that can be managed with only dietary/lifestyle changes. I am, however, taking nattokinase regularly to help with reducing existing fibrin matter in my circulatory system (leg veins in particular) and preventing further fibrin buildup.

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Does your doctor know that you take nattokinase... I know there are some people who say it works and some who say it doesn’t (I prefer to keep an open mind) however I have read that warfarin and nattokinase shouldn’t be mixed. Maybe it is worth starting a new topic just about nattokinase, your experience with it, and gathering up some of the medical literature?

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Yes, I think this is an important topic for people to know about! I've been using the nattokinase as a "fibrin buster" to help address the problems associated with my venous return insufficiency (PTS). There are differing opinions about the use of nattokinase with warfarin. From what I understand, the two work on different parts of the clotting cascade. The nattokinase does not affect my INR, which seems to be my doctor's main concern. Can you point me to the literature that says they shouldn't be taken together?

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